Acknowledging Territory: examples to share

Following are a list of examples of territorial acknowledgements that are currently in use in the area of Toronto Conference.   You can share the example of your community by completing the form at the bottom of the page.


FROM EMMANUEL COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

Statement on Acknowledgement of Traditional Land
Adapted from a revised statement by the Elders Circle (Council of Aboriginal Initiatives) from November 6, 2014

As we gather together (at Emmanuel College), we acknowledge this sacred land on which the University of Toronto operates. It has been a site of human activity for 15,000 years. This land is the territory of the Huron-Wendat and Petun First Nations, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. The territory was the subject of the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Iroquois Confederacy and Confederacy of the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes. Today, the meeting place of Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work in the community, on this territory.

We are also mindful of broken covenants and the need to strive to make right with all our relations.


FROM BATHURST UNITED CHURCH, TORONTO
Bathurst United has adopted the practise of preparing a three-part acknowledgment that includes:

  • The Territorial Acknowledgment as follows:
    We acknowledge that we walk upon the traditional territories of the Mississauga of the New Credit First Nation, Anishnawbe, Haudenosaunee [ho-deh-no-SHAW-nee], Wendat, and Huron Indigenous Peoples, the original nations of this land, who continue to cry out for justice.
  • A Short Reference to a current story related to Aboriginal justice and life
  • A reference to one of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action 

FROM TINA CONLON, COMMUNITY MINISTER DAVENPORT-PERTH
Toronto is home to a large indigenous population including residential school survivors and intergenerational family members who have been impacted by the history and legacy of the residential school system.

The sacred land on which we stand has been a site of human activity for 15,000 years. This land is the territory of the Huron-Wendat and Petun First Nations, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. The territory was the subject of the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Iroquois Confederacy and the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes.

Today, the meeting place of Toronto is still the home to many indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work in the community, on this territory.


DISH WITH ONE SPOON TERRITORY– a deeper acknowlegement 

In considering the inclusion of a territorial acknowledgement at the regular meetings of Toronto City Council, Jamaias DaCosta suggests that a deeper acknowlegement would include The Dish With One Spoon Wampum, an early indigenous treaty to peaceably share the resources of the Great Lakes region. Read the article in April 11, 2014 Muskrat Magazine article, TORONTO AKA TKARONTO PASSES NEW CITY COUNCIL PROTOCOL.

 


Share Your Own Example

Complete this form to share a copy of your own example. (It will not be posted automatically.)

Trick or Treaty? Film

Trick-or-Treaty (1)Trick or Treaty? by Alanis Obomsawin, National Film Board of Canada

2014, 84 min 43 s
This feature documentary by acclaimed filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin (Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance) profiles Indigenous leaders in their quest for justice as they seek to establish dialogue with the Canadian government. By tracing the history of their ancestors since the signing of Treaty No. 9, these leaders aim to raise awareness about issues vital to First Nations in Canada: respect for and protection of their lands and their natural resources, and the right to hunt and fish so that their societies can prosper. In recent years, an awareness-raising movement has been surfacing in First Nations communities. In this powerful documentary, those who refuse to surrender are given a chance to speak out.

 

We Are All Treaty People Webinar

The United Church of Canada hosted a webinar “We are All Treaty People” with presenters Chief Wilton Littlechild and Past Moderator Bill Phipps, moderated by Sara Stratton,  You can view the recording with the powerpoint here. (Opens in Adobe Connect webinar format.)

Treaties from 1760 – 1923: Two sides to the story

Treaties from 1760 – 1923: Two sides to the story: Oral agreements often differed from what appeared in printed document

A CBC news article  by Isabelle Montpetit , CBC News Posted: May 26, 2011  Read it here. The article also refers to Sacred Treaties, Sacred Trust: Working Together for Treaty Implementation and Advancing our Sovereignty as Nations, adopted in 2010 by Canada’s Assembly of First Nations.